http://online-drugs-store.net/buy-vagra-online-cheap/ online-drugs-store.net http://canadian-pharmacy365.com/buy-xenical-online-cheap/ canadian-pharmacy365.com canadian-pharm24.net buy propecia goldpharm.net http://goldpharm.net/buy-glucophage-online-cheap/

Little Germany

German Residents playing cards c.1910

German immigrants composed the second-largest European immigrant community in Britain from 1861-1911, only behind in numbers to the Russian Jews. Their population went from 28,000 in 1861 to just over 50,000 by the outbreak of the War, and they were known as the new foreigners. The unemployed labourers moved to Stratford and West Ham, East London to find work; Stratford had the largest German Community in London.

The King of Prussia pub_courtesy of Newham Archives

Many shops were owned by the German community and one of the local pubs (now the King Edward VI) was called the Prince of Prussia (name changed in 1914). Germanophobia became so intense within Stratford, following the sinking of the Lusitania in 1915, the German-owned shops in Stratford had their windows smashed during riots, and an internment camp in was set up in Carpenters Road, now part of the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park.

German residents in London c.1910

East London specifically had a special relationship with Germany. The famous East Londoner Elizabeth Fry met the King of Prussia, who visited her family in Upton. The Prussian ironclad Konig Wilhelm was constructed at the Thames ironworks, and was launched by Prussian and British dignitaries. The christening was marvelled as a wonder of cooperation, engineering, and ingenuity by Britain. The German population was seen as an asset to the area; certain factories actually paid Germans and their families to move to the area. The Tate Institute hosted a Christmas Eve service in German, with about 150 in attendance.

Audio Clips

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Annette Kuhn talks about her family’s German heritage.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Stuart Hillary talks about his Grandfather’s internment in Stratford.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Susie Morris talks about her Great Grandfather’s arrest.

Egg and Spoon Race at Sutton Dwellings-Bethnal Green-2012

The increase in the German population in West Ham allowed Cannon Street Road to be, known as ‘Little Germany’. The German community built roads and businesses and worked well as part of local community until the outbreak of the Great War.

German Residents of Stepney, c.1920-crop

This project worked with a group of volunteers who carried out research in local archives and the National Archives. We then recorded ten oral history interviews with the descendants of German families who were living in the area during the Great War period. This material was used to produce an exhibition which launched at a special event at the King Edward VI pub in Stratford (formally the King of Prussia). The exhibition then toured local libraries and community centres throughout east London, and remains available for free hire to community groups and schools. We also produced educational resources from the material to be used in school workshops with secondary school pupils.

If you would like to host the exhibition or commission an educational workshop, please contact office@ech.org.uk.
Visit the project blog http://little-germany-stratford-1914.tumblr.com/


The Workshops

Archive Research Visit

School Workshop Participants

Interviewing a participant


Launch of the Exhibition at King Edward VI Pub in Stratford

History Talk and Presentation

Photograph from School Workshops